Impact

“Every lung transplant recipient wants to outrun rejection for as long as he or she can. That’s why the Lung Transplant Foundation’s research is so critical.  I know that I am on borrowed time. My hope is that this pair of lungs will last longer; in the meantime, I’m living every day deliberately and with gratitude.”
— Kim Cable,
two-time lung transplant recipient

Lung transplantation presents very specific challenges, but the most daunting is a form of rejection called bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Doctors know very little about BOS or why recipients are highly susceptible to it.  Currently, there are no effective treatments for BOS and lung transplant rejection.

We are the only major non-profit organization dedicated to funding research into post-transplant rejection.

We began as a small foundation, but have steadily grown to become a nationally recognized advocate for lung transplant research. We are a member of the American Thoracic Society’s PAR Council of Public Representatives. We’re currently the only national lung transplant organization that sits on this prestigious council.

To date, we’ve funded more than $450,000 to help physicians and scientists tackle these difficult and life-threatening issues. As part of our purpose, we also:

  • Educate and promote public awareness about organ donation
  • Advocate for the advancement of research to cure bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), the most common cause of chronic rejection
  • Promote lung transplantation as a viable alternative to end-stage lung disease
  • Provide financial support for lung transplant researchers through national programs
  • Support transplant recipients, their caregivers and families by providing access to vital information [link to resources] needed to navigate the lung transplant process
  • Provide support, encouragement and guidance through our Mentorship Program
  • Partner with donor service organizations to help make lung transplant research a national priority

While doctors and researchers have made great strides in the past 50 years, we still have a long way to go.  In order to make new scientific breakthroughs possible, we need your help to fund research.

Please consider making a gift to support LTF research and patient support programs.